Vitamin D status linked to Parkinson’s symptoms

Vitamin D status linked to Parkinson’s symptoms

They found that: Parkinson’s patients had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D levels relative to healthy controls Those with lower vitamin D levels had a significantly higher frequency of falls and insomnia They also had significantly more depression and anxiety People with Parkinson’s also had a significantly lower mean BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck These findings remained true even after adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index.

The Gut's Role in Parkinson's Disease

The Gut's Role in Parkinson's Disease

pruriens) is a climbing legume best known as a natural source of L-dopa, a dopamine precursor that affects energy, motivation and well-being, and is often used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease in Ayurvedic medicine.

Study Shows Toxic Pesticide Levels in Families Dropped by 60% After One-Week Organic Diet

Study Shows Toxic Pesticide Levels in Families Dropped by 60% After One-Week Organic Diet

Farmers and farmworkers growing our nation's food and the rural communities they live in have a right not to be exposed to chemicals linked to cancer, autism and infertility." — Kendra Klein, PhD, Friends of the Earth "This study shows that organic works," said study co-author Kendra Klein, PhD, senior staff scientist at Friends of the Earth.

Peppers to Help Prevent Parkinson's

Peppers to Help Prevent Parkinson's

One of the most compelling statements in a 2014 study published in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience is that in regard to Parkinson’s disease, “[A] growing body of evidence suggests that nutrition may play an important role.” Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that usually develops in older people, with such symptoms as inflammation, stiff muscles and tremors, all signs of decreased mitochondrial function .

Is Parkinson’s Disease a Gut Problem?

Is Parkinson’s Disease a Gut Problem?

The study, which was conducted at the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan, found that Parkinson’s disease may be triggered, at least for some people, by a gut protein that collects in the appendix.1 These findings were based on an analysis of the medical records of close to 1.7 million men and women in Sweden’s national health database, going back as far as 1964.